Organizations & Resources

The following profiles highlight non-profit organizations, government agencies, coalitions, networks, and initiatives that have been identified by stakeholders around the state as resources and assets for those working in planning and public health. While this list is not comprehensive, it is illustrative of the community health landscape in New Mexico. Each profile includes an overview, relevant programs, projects, or resources, and how to engage. We hope this appendix will serve as a valuable resource to help professionals in planning, public health, and related fields to identify possible partners, relevant resources, and enable future connections.

 

Con Alma
Conalma.org

Overview:

Con Alma seeks to improve the health status and access to health care services for all New Mexican communities and advocates for a health policy that addresses the health needs of all in New Mexico. The Foundation makes grants, contributions, and program-related investments to fulfill its mission. One of its focus areas has been promoting health and equity through the built environment and food access policy. Con Alma Health Foundation is one of only 13 local foundations in the United States to be recognized with a 20112 national Convergence Partnership Innovation Fund grant.

Relevant program/project/resource:

The Healthy People, Healthy Places a successful program about communities coming together to promote health and equity through built environment and food access policy, is no longer actively making grants, but over the past several years it has helped to seed and grow numerous initiatives. Con Alma’s goals for this effort have been to promote equity and health by increasing equitable built environments and access to healthy food with a focus on low-income communities, rural communities, and communities of color; to support the preservation and enhancement of cultural and spiritual assets in the community; and to develop capacity by creating a long-term commitment to equity-focused policy and environmental efforts. Learn more about the program and grantees here: http://conalma.org/wp-content/uploads/HPHP-brochure.pdf

How to engage:
  • Apply for a grant in a different program, if your needs fit with grantmaking guidelines
  • Review past grant makers to learn more about relevant projects and/or seek new partners
  • Access publications and other resources (https://conalma.org/resources/) and/or attend events (https://conalma.org/news/news/) to build your knowledge and capacity.


Doña Ana Communities United

First Choice Community Health Care, South Valley Community Commons

Health Matters New Mexico
www.healthmattersnm.org

Overview:

Health Matters New Mexico (HMNM) was established in June of 2006 as Bernalillo County Place Matters, one of 19 teams located throughout the United States that works in partnership with Collaboratives for Health Equity (CHE). The team is committed to improving the health of communities by addressing the root causes that lead to poor health. Health Matters New Mexico advocates for land use, social, and economic policies that will create healthy neighborhoods and resolve the disproportionate environmental burdens on communities of color and other economically vulnerable communities of New Mexico.

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • Our Land Our Health Toolkit – This project was originally funded by the Con Alma Health Foundation, with continuing funding through the Healthy Here initiative. The toolkit explains the land use permitting steps to community members so they can actively and efficiently participate in land use decisions that affect them. This toolkit is intended to help low-income communities and communities of color in rural and urban areas navigate the environmental regulatory processes of New Mexico. The toolkit was pilot tested and then distributed to neighborhood associations and other community groups in Bernalillo County and Doña Ana County. View the toolkit here: http://www.healthmattersnm.org/projectshias/land-health-toolkit/
  • Our Streets, Our Health transportation improvement guide: http://www.healthmattersnm.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Our-Streets-Our-Health-MRCOG-transportation.pdf
How to engage:


Healthier Schools New Mexico
www.healthierschoolsnm.org

Overview:

Healthier Schools New Mexico provides information to educators, administrators, community members and business leaders about programs and resources related to student health and academic success.

The organization focuses on eight components of coordinated school health: nutrition; health education and life skills; physical education and activity; staff wellness; family, school and community partnerships; healthy and safe environment; social and emotional wellbeing; and health services.

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • Healthier Schools NM promotes a number of programs and policies at the intersection of health, planning, and education. Two examples include:
    21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC): part of the School and Family Support Bureau, Federal Program Division, New Mexico Public Education Department. The program aims to support exceptional out-of-school time learning and developmental experiences throughout the state of New Mexico. Centers, which can be located in elementary or secondary schools or other similarly accessible facilities, provide a range of high-quality services during non-school hours or periods when school is not in session. Local education agencies and public or private organizations are eligible to apply for 21st CCLC 4-year awards through a Request for Proposal process.
  • New Mexico Homeless Education Program: The McKinney-Vento Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program is designed to address the problems that homeless children and youth have faced in enrolling, attending, and succeeding in school. The related Act ensures educational rights and protections for children and youth experiencing homelessness. Learn more here: http://healthierschoolsnm.org/index.php?page=homeless-education-program
How to engage:
  • Access resources related to each of the eight components of coordinated health
  • Each specific initiative presents different opportunities to engage; visit the website to learn more


Healthy Here

McCune Charitable Foundation
http://nmmccune.org

Overview:

The McCune Charitable Foundation is dedicated to enriching the health, education, environment, cultural and spiritual life of New Mexicans. The Foundation makes grants to non-profits throughout the state, focused on the following priorities: capacity building in the non-profit sector; economic development and family asset building; education transformation and early childhood development; leveraging opportunities in health care; local food industry development; building links between arts and community engagement; stewardship of natural resources; influencing urban planning and built environments; and strategies for rural development.

Relevant program/project/resource:

The following grantmaking priorities are particularly relevant to integrated planning and public health approaches:

  • Local food industry development: The Foundation supports development of market-based alternatives that produce better health outcomes and contribute more directly to New Mexico’s economic well-being.
  • Building links between arts and community engagement: The Foundation supports programs and organizations that seek to leverage arts, creative expression and aesthetic experiences for the purpose of inspiring and driving higher levels of community and civic engagement.
  • Influencing urban planning and built environments: The Foundation supports the development of built environments around the state and will continue to view such developments as critical, supporting strategies that encourage energy efficiency, build civic engagement and support economic development.
  • Strategies for rural development: The Foundation supports strategies and approaches that drive effective economic development, educational advancements and other initiatives benefiting rural areas.
How to engage:
  • Apply for a grant, if your needs fit with grantmaking guidelines
  • Review past grant makers to learn more about relevant projects and/or seek new partners
  • Access publications and other resources (http://nmmccune.org/resources) to build your knowledge and capacity


McKinley County Collaborative for Health Equity
http://nmhep.org/partners/mckinley-community-che/

Overview:

Using a health equity lens, the McKinley Community Collaborative for Health Equity team seeks to change systems that perpetuate environmental health disparities related to the impacts of institutional racism and multi-generational trauma by empowering participating communities within the county to impact equitable policy change.

Relevant program/project/resource:

Looking Within: A Health Impact Assessment on Uranium Mining: In July 1979 at the United Nuclear Corporation uranium processing mill in Northwest New Mexico, a dam broke releasing more than 1,100 tons of uranium mining waste tailings along with 100 million gallons of radioactive water into the Pipeline Arroyo that went downstream along the Rio Puerco. The collaborative is conducting a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to analyze how uranium mining in McKinley County affected the physical, emotional, economic and spiritual health of communities. The HIA looks at the following health determinants: environmental exposures/contamination; displacement and relocation; cultural relevance of the land to holistic health; and community efficacy. Learn more here: http://nmhep.org/resources/hia-reports/mc-hia/

How to engage:
  • Attend upcoming events and access recent resources/reports related to McKinley County: http://nmhep.org/partners/mckinley-community-che/
  • Contact Anna Rondon (nmsjei@gmail.com) to learn about current projects and identify specific ways to participate


New Mexico Complete Streets Leadership Team
Completestreetsnm.org

Overview:

The Complete Streets Leadership Team’s main goal is to provide resources to help New Mexico work toward the adoption and implementation of Complete Streets policies and design standards throughout the state. The team provides information about the latest initiatives, events, training opportunities and news on Complete Streets in New Mexico and offers additional support via presentations, letters of support, and technical expertise. In support of its mission, the team currently has three focus areas: complete streets state legislation; organizing and/or participating in events that promote and support complete streets; and safety. Team members, more than 80 around the state, are from organizations such as the Mid-Region Council of Governments, Healthy Here, NM American Society of Landscape Architects, City of Albuquerque, Weston Solutions, Sites Southwest, Bernalillo County, Urban ABQ, Bike ABQ, Farmington MPO, NM Chronic Disease Prevention Council, Laguna Pueblo, Bohannan Huston, University of New Mexico, Mesilla Valley Bike Coalition and other private consultants and advocates.

Relevant program/project/resource:
How you can engage:
  • Via Complete Streets Advisory boards in local communities around the state
  • Attend (in-person or virtually) statewide monthly meetings (information on their website)
  • Access resources and members of the network for ideas, guidance, etc. related to your work or specific projects


New Mexico Community Data Collaborative

New Mexico Health Equity Partnership
http://nmhep.org

Overview:

New Mexico Health Equity Partnership (NMHEP), an initiative at the Santa Fe Community Foundation, focuses on building an infrastructure of community-based leadership that has the capacity and knowledge to change systems and address issues that make it possible for every New Mexican to have an opportunity to live a healthy life. NMHEP provides trainings to strengthen advocacy, creates critical connections and linkages, fosters authentic community engagement, and provides resources to increase organizational and advocacy capacity. The Partnership’s extended network includes a broad base of community members, advocacy groups, civic organizations, youth groups, faith-based organizations, nonprofits, legal service providers, universities and other educational entities, government agencies and other allies working closely with NMHEP-affiliated organizations. NMHEP’s core partners in each region include: (metro) Healthy Places for New Mexico, (Northeast) San Juan Community Collaborative for Health Equity and San Miguel HIA team, (Northwest) McKinley Community Collaborative for Health Equity, and (Southwest) Doña Ana Communities United.

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • HIA Resources: NMHEP trains residents and community groups on how to make a more compelling case with greater impact when engaging policymakers on issues they care most about. Through the HIA, advocates and residents learn how to collect and utilize data that can inform policy change and hold decision makers more accountable. The HIA has been an effective means to empowering and elevating community members’ voices. In addition to technical support, NMHEP occasionally provides funding to conduct HIAs. Learn more here: http://nmhep.org/resources/hia-resources/
  • See separate profiles for each partner’s priorities and initiatives
How you can engage:
  • Sign up as a network member (individual or organization) to learn more about other partners, events, resources, and more across the state.
  • Learn about HIAs as a tool and access resources to start your own.
  • Access other trainings and resources related to community engagement and health equity. Learn more here: http://nmhep.org/resources/nmhep-services/


New Mexico Public Health Association
www.nmpha.org

Overview:

The New Mexico Public Health Association’s (NMPHA’s) mission is to promote public health practice, policies, and systems that support health equity in New Mexico. To do so, NMPHA provides a forum for sharing research and practices, and serves as a base for leadership development, networking, and action. Membership (approximately 250 individuals across the state) consists of approximately one-third community organizations/coalitions (including private consultants doing public health work), one-third government employees (state, county, city, federal) and one-third university/academic-related (staff, faculty, students), representing over 30 different communities in New Mexico and neighboring states. Countless others are not members, but still consider themselves part of the NMPHA community and benefit from NMPHA events and activities. NMPHA is the New Mexico state affiliate of the American Public Health Association (APHA). Current priority areas include: social determinants of health, environmental health and justice, universal access to health care. Learn more here: http://www.nmpha.org/page-491091

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • Health in All Policies Toolkit: The goal of Health in All Policies (HiAP) is to promote healthy community environments and prevent adverse health impacts in the future through intentional collaborative work across all sectors of government and the community. In support of this endeavor, an NMPHA working group developed a toolkit, which includes resources, videos, communications tools, and other multimedia and interactive features to support an understanding of health in all policies. This toolkit is available for anyone who is interested in implementing health in all policies. Learn more and access the resources here: http://www.nmpha.org/HiAP_toolkit
  • NMPHA also convenes a statewide Health Policy Legislative Forum every year to bring together organizations and individuals who are advocating for legislative policies in the New Mexico Legislature. The Forum provides an opportunity to share potential and proposed legislation, to build alliances and find partners, and to learn how the New Mexico Legislature functions. In addition, workshops on special topics are presented to encourage dialogue and deepen our awareness.
How you can engage:

NMPHA is primarily a member-driven organization, and individuals and organizations – including and beyond those in official public health roles – can join: http://www.nmpha.org/page-535786
In addition to accessing resources such as the HiAP toolkit, NMPHA hosts events such as its annual conference: http://www.nmpha.org/page-1501348


New Mexico Public Health Institute
http://swchi.org/new-mexico-public-health-institute-newmexphi/

Overview:

Developed by the Southwest Center for Health Innovation and newly-established in 2017 with funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the mission of the New Mexico Public Health Institute (NewMexPHI) is to challenge the status quo by creating an environment in which social and health conditions allow individuals, families, and communities to thrive. A major focus is to improve capacity in rural and frontier New Mexico to advance behavioral health. NewMexPHI provides organizational and technical support to partners and community members to better equip them to collect and use public health data, implement and monitor evidence-based public health programs, and ultimately, save lives and money.

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • Equity in Policy Institute: NewMexPHI will partner with UNM’s College of Population Health and RWJF Center for Health Policy to co-host an “Equity in Policy Institute.” It will focus on racial and geographic health equity and social justice issues to advance the health and wellbeing of children and families in New Mexico.
  • Health Informatics and Data Commons: The New Mexico Community Data Collaborative (NMCDC) will provide direct access and use of data commons to partners and participants in NewMexPHI regional forums.
  • Completing a “mega-analysis” of existing needs assessments that focus on public health or population health systems in NM to inform us about further potential functions of NewMexPHI.
    Stakeholder convening and facilitation: provide the opportunity for rural and frontier New Mexicans to begin transforming the behavioral and population health systems to meet local needs and resources.
How you can engage:

New Mexico Resiliency Alliance
http://www.nmresiliencyalliance.org/
Overview:

The New Mexico Resiliency Alliance supports locally-driven economic resilience in NM’s rural and underserved communities. Its focus is on strengthening the capacity of New Mexico’s communities to adapt and thrive in a changing economy. The Alliance mobilizes resources and facilitates partnerships to support locally-driven economic development activities statewide. The Alliance provides leadership and networking opportunities to strengthen community collaborations and conducts research and advocacy to ensure that New Mexico’s rural and underserved communities have a voice in state- and national-level economic development policy dialogue and resource allocation.

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • Resilient Communities Fund: provides direct funding for projects that showcase and enhance the unique strengths of the communities in which they are situated. Focuses on projects in the following priority areas: Design & Planning / Placemaking; Entrepreneurship & Business Development;
  • Organizational Capacity Building; Civic / Youth Engagement; Marketing & Promotions; Food Security & Environmental Stewardship
  • Learn about specific projects the Resiliency Alliance has been involved in here: http://www.nmresiliencyalliance.org/project-snapshots
How you can engage:

Presbyterian Healthcare Services Center for Community Health
https://www.phs.org/community/committed-to-community-health/Pages/community-health-program-highlights.aspx
Overview:

Established in 2016, the Center for Community Health focuses on three priority areas: healthy eating, active living, and avoiding unhealthy substances. These priorities were created with input during community health needs assessments in 10 New Mexico counties. Through a range of partnerships (see below), Presbyterian makes its own investments and helps bring in external funding to support initiatives, with the Center for Community Health often providing backbone administration and managerial support of various efforts.

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • Healthy Here Mobile Farmers’ Markets in Bernalillo County (https://www.facebook.com/HealthyHereMobileFarmersMarket/)
  • La Cosecha, a project of the Agri-Cultural network: farmer-owned cooperative and community supported agriculture, in which low-income South Valley families invest in local farms and receive weekly produce boxes (http://lacosechacsa.org/)
  • International District Health Communities Coalition (IDHCC): as part of the Healthy Here initiative, Presbyterian has partnered with the IDHCC on the “Light the District” project. This project engages community members and other stakeholders in planning and implementing an action-oriented approach to increase safety in the International District.
  • Prescription Trails: Presbyterian supports Prescription Trails as part of the active living priority. The Prescription Trails program is designed to increase walking and wheelchair rolling on suggested routes and promotes healthy lifestyles for families. Prescription Trails is a collaborative team effort. Partners of the Albuquerque Alliance for Active Living envisioned the program with encouragement from the National Park Service Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance Program. A Prescription Trails walking guide is available for healthcare professionals and their patients. This walking guide lists parks and open trails by ZIP codes or city neighborhoods, making it easier for people to see what options exist for walking in different areas of the city.
How you can engage:

Means of engagement is primarily through each of the initiatives the Center for Community Health is involved in. Learn more here: https://www.phs.org/community/committed-to-community-health/Pages/community-health-program-highlights.aspx


San Juan Collaborative for Health Equity
http://nmhep.org/partners/san-juan-community-che/

Overview:

The purpose of the San Juan Collaborative for Health Equity (SJCHE) is to work with rural and metropolitan communities that are impacted by social, economic and health disparities stemming from environmental racism, lack of unity, or apathy in tribal and urban communities. Through community engagement projects, SJCHE addresses issues of the disadvantaged Native Americans/Navajos/Dine’, focused on: Homeless Task Force; Race Healing; Dine’ Food Sovereignty; Dine’ Youth; and the impacts of environmental fracking.

How you can engage:

Santa Fe Art Institute

Santa Fe Community Foundation
http://www.santafecf.org/
Overview:

The Santa Fe Community Foundation (SFCF) works to improve the quality of life in Northern New Mexico by building and managing charitable funds established by individuals, families, groups, organizations, and institutions. SFCF makes grants from these funds that both anticipate and respond to community need; they also provide technical assistance, convening, and grantmaking services to family foundations.

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • MoGro (Mobile Grocery), an initiative of the Santa Fe Community Foundation, is a nonprofit mobile grocery initiative working to support sustainable local food systems and eliminate barriers to affordable healthy food. MoGro works in rural and Tribal lands, partnering with Pueblo communities, the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, Skarsgard Farms, and La Montañita Co-op to address healthy food access in low-income and underserved regions of New Mexico. More than just food access, MoGro facilitates community-based nutrition education, fitness classes, cooking lessons, technical assistance to new food retailers and community outreach to re-establish the vital link between local agriculture, nutrition and health. More information here: http://www.santafecf.org/page.aspx?pid=1108
  • New Mexico Health Equity Partnership (see separate profile for more information)
How you can engage:

Southwest Center for Health Innovation
www.swchi.org
Overview:

The Southwest Center for Health Innovation (CHI) is a nonprofit organization focusing on community health. Its mission is to develop and implement policies, strategies, and models in underserved communities and underrepresented populations at local, state, and national levels to improve quality of life, health status, and equity. CHI empowers groups and individuals at a local, state and national level to determine the future wellbeing of their communities through policy, advocacy, education, and programs.

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • New Mexico Public Health Institute (see separate profile)
    Food Policy Councils: the Hidalgo County Food Coalition and the Southwest New Mexico Food Policy
  • Council regard the availability of affordable and healthy food as a social justice issue. CHI helped to establish food policy councils at the local/county and regional levels.
  • Unified Prevention Coalition for Doña Ana County: collective partnership focused on preventing substance use and abuse among youth and young adults in Doña Ana County.
  • FORWARD NM: focused on enhancing access to quality health care, particularly primary and preventive care, by improving the supply and distribution of healthcare professionals through community and academic educational partnerships.
  • REACH Su Comunidad: together with partners, CHI provides training and technical assistance to ten communities across five states to enable community health workers to address health disparities experienced by Hispanic/Latino communities.
How you can engage:

Learn more about each program and how to engage here: http://swchi.org/programs-and-partnerships/programs/


University of New Mexico Prevention Research Center

University of New Mexico School of Architecture and Planning: Design and Public Health

Indigenous Design and Planning Institute, University of New Mexico

UNM Health Extension Rural Officers
http://hsc.unm.edu/community/hero/

Overview:

Health Extension Rural Offices (HEROs) are New Mexico’s Health Extension program, developed over the last three years and built on the agricultural Cooperative Extension Service model. HEROs aim to link UNM Health Sciences Center programs and resources to rural and underserved communities across the mission areas of education, clinical service, research and health policy. The HERO program provides: technical assistance; training and education; facilitation and coaching; addressing priority health needs; linking to shared resources; and advocacy and informing policy. NM partners include: community hospitals, colleges, cooperative extension, community health centers, civic organizations, medicaid managed care, and Area Health Education Council. Priority NM social determinants include: poverty; low employment; low educational attainment; poor housing; inadequate nutrition; social isolation.

Relevant program/project/resource:

The program has contributed to the Health Extension Toolkit, which provides guidance and resources regarding health extension. Access the toolkit here: http://healthextensiontoolkit.org/

How you can engage:

New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service
http://extension.nmsu.edu/
Overview:

NMSU Cooperative Extension Service provides people around the state with practical, research-based knowledge and programs to improve their quality of life. The base programs are: agriculture and natural resources, consumer and family issues (including health and wellbeing), youth development, and community economic development. There are 33 county offices and a Federally Recognized Tribal Extension Program.

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • Family and Consumer Sciences: serving every county in the state, this center targets programming around: diabetes, disaster preparedness, family health and wellness, family life and child development, family resource management, food and nutrition, and food technology. Learn more about specific programs here: http://efcs.nmsu.edu/
  • Economic Development: focus areas include: NM food industry resources, better government through education, community resources and economic development, Southwest border food protection, NM agriculture leadership, and youth leadership programs. Learn more here: http://extension.nmsu.edu/econdev.html
How you can engage:

APA-NM Chapter
http://www.apa-nm.org/
Overview:

With the mission of improving and promoting the quality and standards of planning in New Mexico, the American Planning Association-New Mexico Chapter (APA-NM) is an organization of professional planners and planning officials who serve New Mexico’s communities in many ways, at all levels of government, the private sector and not-for-profit organizations. Specific chapter goals include: increase the impact and visibility of planning; increase the planning expertise of professional planners; increase expertise of elected officials, citizen planners, and students; and seek, maintain, and enhance relationships with affiliated groups and organizations.

Relevant program/project/resource:
How you can engage:

NMDOH Health Promotion
https://nmhealth.org/about/phd/phdo/hlp/
Overview:

Health Promotion is a set of strategies that are meant to address issues that influence health; epidemiology is at the core of Public Health and Health Promotion work. Health Promotion works to develop leadership and other skills within communities so that communities can develop health priorities and goals. Primarily, Health Promotion teams work with health councils across the state to support them as they conduct health assessment, set community health priorities, and plan activities. Health Promotion teams share evidenced-based interventions with local health councils when they’re ready to implement projects and/or interventions. One of the functions of each regional Health Promotion Team is connecting people to resources. The teams rely heavily on external resources for expertise, data, information, and support.

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • Each region (Northwest, Southwest, Southeast, Northeast) of the state has its own Health Promotion team, health councils, and partners. To learn more about the partners, priorities and projects in each region, visit this webpage: https://nmhealth.org/about/phd/phdo/hlp/
  • One example of a Health Promotion team working closely with planners is in the Northeast region, where the Santa Fe Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) works with local and regional partners to develop the Santa Fe Transportation Master Plan for traditional and alternative modes of transportation, including the Santa Fe Pedestrian Master Plan and the Santa Fe Bicycle Master Plan.
  • Resources the Health Promotion teams often rely on in their work include: American Public Health Association, National Association of County and City Health Officials, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, and the Community Tool Box (https://nmhealth.org/about/phd/phdo/hlp/)
How you can engage:

Behavioral Health Collaborative
http://www.hsd.state.nm.us/behavioral-health-collaborative.aspx
Overview:

The Behavioral Health Collaborative was created during the 2004 Legislative Session. The enabling statute allows several state agencies and multiple resources across state government involved in behavioral health prevention, treatment, and recovery to work as one in an effort to improve mental health and substance abuse services in New Mexico. This cabinet-level group represents 15 state agencies and the Governor’s office.

The vision of the Collaborative is to be a single, statewide behavioral health delivery system in which funds are managed effectively and efficiently and to create an environment in which the support of recovery and development of resiliency is expected, mental health is promoted, the adverse affects of substance abuse and mental illness are prevented or reduced, and behavioral health recipients are assisted in participating fully in the lives of their communities.

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • Inventorying all expenditures for mental health and substance abuse services;
  • Creating a single behavioral health care and services delivery system that promotes mental health, emphasizes prevention, early intervention, resiliency, recovery and rehabilitation, where funds are managed efficiently, and ensures availability of services throughout the State;
  • Paying special attention to regional, cultural, rural, frontier, urban and border issues, and seeking suggestions of Native Americans.
  • Contracting with a single, Statewide services purchasing entity (SE); Monitoring service capacities and utilization in order to achieve desired performance measures and outcomes;
  • Making decisions regarding funds, interdepartmental staff, grant writing, and grants management;
    Comprehensive planning and meeting State and federal requirements;
  • Overseeing systems of care, data management, performance and outcome indicators, rate setting, services definitions, considering consumer, family, and citizen input, monitoring training, ensuring that evidence-based practices receive priority, and providing oversight for fraud and abuse and licensing and certification.
How to engage:

New Mexico Alliance of Health Councils
http://www.nmhealthcouncils.org/aboutnmahc
Overview:

New Mexico is one of a handful of states with a Public Health Department that is centralized at the State level. This system creates a need for local bodies to identify community health needs, establish community priorities and plan and implement local solutions. In NM, Health Councils perform those vital services.

The Councils have provided community-based health planning and coordination in NM since their creation in 1991. There are 38 Councils in total, working on the county and tribal level, and grouped into five regions: Northeast, Southeast, Southwest, Northwest, Metro. The Councils are as varied as the communities they serve. Even with sometimes very limited resources, they have been able to mobilize and support their communities to accomplish amazing things. Each Council sets its own priorities, projects, and ways of working to fit its local context. Learn more about each Council here: http://www.nmhealthcouncils.org/successstories

Core funding for the health councils (primarily to support a local coordinator for each council) was provided from 1992 through 2010 by the Legislature, through the New Mexico Department of Health. However, this funding was suspended in July of 2010, as part of across-the-board State government budget cuts following the national economic downturn. Some of the health councils have been able to secure limited local and foundation funding to continue their work, while others continue to function on a largely volunteer basis.

In 2013 and 2015 the New Mexico Legislature appropriated funding to the health councils totaling $395,000/year, which was signed by Governor Susana Martinez and incorporated into the annual budget of the NM Department of Health. NMDOH staff work with the councils to conduct community health assessments, plans, and community programs and activities to improve health in their communities. However, in order to achieve their full potential, the health councils need enough funding to hire at least a part-time staff coordinator, who can help carry out the decisions and actions of the council. The NM Alliance of Health Councils will again work with the Legislature in 2016 to seek additional funding to make this part-time staffing possible. A multi-year evaluation of the health councils in 2008-2011 demonstrated that the health councils were able to accomplish a great deal more for their communities with local staff support.

The New Mexico Alliance of Health Councils exists to support and strengthen the state’s county and tribal health councils. The Alliance works closely with the New Mexico Health Equity Partnership, the New Mexico Department of Health, and other statewide entities, and serves as a support and communications hub for the state’s health councils. Specifically, the Alliance:

  • Establishes a unified voice to strengthen and promote the value and services of community health councils, through state and local education and advocacy;
  • Assists the health councils in seeking and obtaining funding to support community health improvement;
  • Build the capacity of all health councils to continue and expand their work, through conferences, training workshops, a newsletter, and web-based information exchange.
Relevant program/project/resource:

A three-year (2008-2011) evaluation by the University of New Mexico and the NM Department of Health found that the health councils accomplished outcomes that will improve public health in New Mexico. The evaluation found that the councils serve as hubs for public health in their communities, and in a three year period the councils:

  • Developed 142 new programs and initiatives leading to improvements in community health. They also played key roles in addressing emerging health issues, such as the H1N1 epidemic.
  • Influenced policies to improve public health at the local, regional, and state levels. They helped to build coalitions, task forces, and public/private collaborations to improve immunization rates, reduce teen pregnancy, prevent suicides, reduce childhood obesity, improve access to health care.
  • Leveraged $3.5 million in new funding for communities to support local health initiatives and priorities (not including state funding for the health councils themselves)
  • Read the full report here: http://www.nmhealthcouncils.org/Resources/Documents/HC%20Evaluation%20Results–NMPHA%20March%2031,%202014%281%29.pdf
How to engage:

Each health council has a key contact person and regular meeting time. See who to contact about attending a meeting in your area here: http://www.nmhealthcouncils.org/Health-Council-Regular-Meeting-Times


United Way of Carlsbad and South Eddy County
http://www.unitedwayofcarlsbad.org/

Overview:

United Way of Carlsbad & South Eddy County’s work is focused on improving lives and strengthening communities. Focus areas include education, income, and health.

United Way recognized that there are underlying community challenges that cannot be solved by dollars alone, so we are focusing efforts in several key areas to make an even greater impact. In addition to the tremendous contributions our funded programs make, we must place even more emphasis on being a year-round, positive force in South Eddy County. United Way is doing more than just raising and investing dollars, we are also working collaboratively with a whole range of community partners to achieve lasting results.

United Way’s work is guided by an all volunteer Board of Directors that operates independently from any other governing body. After thorough review and analysis by the volunteers, polices are established and funding decisions are made. Decisions are based on a variety of factors including where United Way can make the most impact in the community.

Relevant program/project/resource:
  • Eddy County Health Council: the Executive Director serves as the coordinator for the Eddy County Health Council, and the Resource Manager plays an active role. Working alongside other health and human service organizations, the role of the health council is to complete a community health profile, identify needs & resources, analyze issues and establish priorities.
  • Community Impact Grant program: most funds are allocated through this program, which supports agencies providing services focused on health, education, and/or income support.
  • Emerging Community Impact grant program: UWCSEC provides a mechanism for funding outside its existing Community Impact grant making in order to remain responsive to agency and community needs during the year. More information available here: http://www.unitedwayofcarlsbad.org/grantrequests
How you can engage:
  • Become involved in the local health council (see more information in NM Alliance of Health Councils profile)
  • Apply for a grant, if you are based in that region and your needs fit funding priorities
  • Explore other community programs: http://www.unitedwayofcarlsbad.org/community-partners